Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Review: STUFF by George Graybill

Genre: Non-Fiction

Description:

“From Archimedes’ bathtub to Schrödinger’s cat, the reader follows the dramatic and humorous events in the history of the ongoing struggle to understand the basic nature of matter and, in the process, painlessly absorbs all the major concepts of middle school physical science.

The structure of the book takes advantage of the fact that basic concepts about the nature of matter were discovered in roughly the same sequence they are taught. The book begins with the ancient Greeks, who first talked about atoms from a viewpoint that was more philosophical than scientific. The story of the next 2,000 years highlights the events and characters in the history of the study of matter. The book ends on the note that all the knowledge we have gained has led us back to asking philosophical questions such as, “Why does matter exist?” The tone is one of whimsy, weirdness, and irreverence. Although historical events are embellished or even completely fabricated for comic effect, it is always clear that the science is accurate. Adult readers will find this book thoroughly entertaining, but it can also serve as a supplement to a middle school physical science class. It should appeal to students who can’t get enough of science and to those looking for something less boring than their textbook.”

Author:

George Graybill says he has “worked as a professional student, oceanographer, bum, woodworker, research chemist, chemistry teacher, and science writer in that order.” Graybill has written everything from magazine articles and science textbooks to questions for standardized tests. You can find out more on his blog.

Appraisal:

The author lays out his goal for this book at the very beginning. He wants to mix interesting stories, jokes, and actual scientific facts in such a way that it is both educational and entertaining. As he put it, “It will be like eating ice cream that someone has secretly injected with vitamins.”

For the most part, I think he succeeds. I’m sure there are those who will never get this stuff, but for those who are interested it can refresh your memory about the stuff that you’ve forgotten. (I especially liked the discussion of the scientific method and the discussion of the definition of terms like theory and scientific law.) It will teach you things you might not have learned. (I’ve had a vague understanding of Schrödinger’s cat, but don’t think I’d ever understood the complete story of this famous feline before now.)

I’m not sure reading this is as good as ice cream, but it is pretty darn entertaining. And yeah, I learned stuff without really trying. Give it a try.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

Format/Typo Issues:

A small number of typos and other proofing issues.

Rating: **** Four Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 25-30,000 words

Monday, December 11, 2017

Reprise Review: A Christmas Carol 2: The Return of Scrooge by Robert J. Elisberg



Genre: Christmas/Humor

Description:

“A continuation of the beloved Christmas tale that quickly goes flying off in its own comic direction. It begins five years after dear old Ebenezer Scrooge has passed away and left his thriving firm to his former clerk, Bob Cratchit. However, Bob's overly-generous benevolence with lending and charity-giving has driven the company into the ground, on the verge of bankruptcy. And so the ghost of Scrooge returns one Christmas Eve to teach Cratchit the true meaning of money. Making the swirling journey through Christmases past, present, and yet-to-be all the more of a chaotic ride for Cratchit are the dozens of characters from other Dickens novels woven throughout the story, together for the first time. God bless them, most everyone.”

Author:

Robert J. Ellsworth is a native of Chicago who has written for a number of magazines, written screenplays (some for movies you might have seen,) non-fiction books, and is a two-time recipient of the Lucille Ball Award for comedy screenwriting.

Appraisal:

It may seem strange to compare a Christmas book to the book The Princess Bride (you’ve seen the movie even if you haven’t read the book, right?), but I’m going to, because A Christmas Carol 2 reminded me of this classic in multiple ways (I know the literati might not call it a classic, but I do).

The first similarity is the premise that the book was written by someone other than the author. The Princess Bride was claimed to have been written by S. Morgenstern with a story involving the author, William Goldman, having it read to him as a sick child, only to discover as an adult that there were boring parts, so he’d republished it in what, if memory serves me correctly, was originally referred to as “the good parts edition.” This book (or so the claim goes) was written by Charles Dickens with Robert J. Ellsberg providing some commentary via footnotes.

Another similarity is the humor, sometimes subtle, in both. For example, A Christmas Carol 2 inserts short (sometimes just two or three words) from other sources (often Christmas songs and other seasonal fare) in ways that work in the context of the story, while evoking the source. I’m not sure whether everyone would see these as humorous, but it tickled my funny bone. A few examples are saying “the weather outside was frightful” or describing someone as “a jolly, happy soul with a corncob pipe and a button nose.” A second, ongoing joke was the appearance of several characters from other Dickens’ books with footnotes explaining the reason for including this character, often including actual (made up) quotes of correspondence between Dickens and his editor.

At one point as reading I started wondering if the author was making a political statement with the subtext (it seemed to be headed that way), but in the end, I decided I was probably seeing things (sometimes a cigar is just a cigar). If there was a message, it was one of moderation. I found this “sequel” to the beloved Christmas classic a fun read on many different levels.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count35-40,000 words

Friday, December 8, 2017

Review: The Most Boring Christmas Special Ever Written by Rudolf Kerkhoven


Genre: Satire/Christmas

Description:

“This Christmas season, give that special someone the gift of tedium.

BUYER BEWARE! Do NOT purchase this book if you are looking for any of the following:
-Miracles
-Elves
-General merriment
-Religious undertones
-Impromptu group renditions of Christmas carols
-People playing in snow
-A feeling of warmth and/or fuzziness
-Rekindled romance
-Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer
-Santa*
-Joy
-That inner warmth that comes from giving someone the perfect gift

*Actually, Santa may make an appearance.”

Author:

The author of several novels, plus the co-author with Daniel Pitts of several choose-your-own-adventure books, Rudolf Kerkhoven lives in the Vancouver, British Columbia area. For more, visit his website.

Appraisal:

This is a Christmas story, kind of. It takes place on Christmas Eve, so it must be.

This is a choose your own adventure (or path or whatever) book, kind of. Adventure is singular, not plural.

But mostly this is satire. If you like dry humor… If you’re a bit of a nerdy nitpicker… If you find that people can be confusing… then this book might be satirizing you and I’d say puts you squarely in the target audience. If you can’t laugh at yourself and all that jazz, right?

Yeah, that all describes me. I’ve got the Christmas spirit now. If it describes you, this is the kind of book that will tickle your fancy. Or your funny bone. (If you’re ticklish.)

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues.

Rating: **** Four Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 35-40,000 words

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Reprise Review : Pieces (stories) by Michael Crane


Genre: Short Story Collection/Literary Fiction

Description:

“When a little girl's body is found in the woods, a once quiet town is shaken to its core as it deals with the aftermath in this short story collection. In these twelve stories connected by a terrible tragedy, grown-ups and children alike try put the pieces back together again without any easy answers.”

Author:

Mr. Crane is an indie author of slice-of-life short stories, a series of drabble collections, and a horror novella and novelette. He has also contributed to several short story anthologies with other indie authors. Mr. Crane lives in Illinois with his wife, two cats, and a chinchilla.

You can connect with him on his Facebook page or blog.

Appraisal:

I have to say up front that I am a huge fan of Mr. Crane’s writing. I have read all of his works, even the ones he doesn’t like to talk about. I was excited to see him get back to writing another collection of slice-of-life stories. Pieces (stories) did not disappoint!

It is awesome the way each of these stories touch on the many different facets, fears, complications, and choices faced as both a child and in adulthood. Although the stories are complete read individually, every entry is made richer by the characters’ reactions to the tragic event that connects them together. Each one gets more personal as you learn details about who the missing girl is and what happened to her. It is perfect how it moves from the effects felt from hearing about the event, seeing it on TV, having it be located in your neighborhood, and ending up with the feelings of the missing girl’s best friend.

Here is how a few of the stories hit home for me. Dandyclean reminded me of the Beltway sniper attacks when everyone was suspicious of white box trucks in the area; also my dislike of door-to-door salespeople. In A Dangerous Place, I could hear my husband teasing me about being too connected with TV, the Internet, and my cell phone hyping all the tragic news and weather events. The ending was a big surprise for me! A Concerned Parent captures the difficult feelings parents must have about protecting and keeping their children safe while fostering independence. With all the abductions, murders, and shooting being reported, it’s not easy to keep thinking it won’t happen in my neighborhood. Vigilantes was a tough read… the emotions of what you would like to do, what you know is right, and how a personal experience can change your thinking. I felt that the author explored both the right and wrong with this situation and left it up in the air as to what might have happened.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

Format/Typo Issues:

No issues found.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: Fredlet

Approximate word count25-30,000 words

Monday, December 4, 2017

Review: Take Risks: One Couple’s Journey to Quit Their Jobs and Hit the Open Road by Joe Russo


Genre: Travel Memoir/Motivational/Self-Help

Description:

“What if you could walk away from the pressures and stresses of corporate life, and live outside of the routines and restrictions? What if you could choose where you live on a daily basis, have a beach view on Monday and a view of the mountains on Friday? What if, instead of trading your days and weeks and years for a life deferred, you just went and lived that life right now?
These were the questions Joe and Kait Russo asked themselves as they faced endless corporate meetings, inconvenient business trips, and the crushing stress of ‘making it.’ It all changed when Kait asked Joe, ‘What if we sold our house and got an RV?’”

Author:

“In 2015 Joe Russo and his wife Kait quit their jobs, got rid of most of their possessions to live their dream – travel and work for themselves.”
“Joe Russo grew up in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles. He's had an eclectic career starting in video game design, TV production and finally a 10 year career in Product Development before he decided to quit it all.”

For more from Joe and his wife Kait, visit their website or check outtheir Youtube channel.

Appraisal:

I’d heard of the Russos, Joe and Kait, a year or two ago. I had liked their Facebook page and then forgot about them. Then a few weeks ago I noticed a Facebook post which led to binge watching a bunch of their videos on YouTube, some of which mentioned the book Joe had written that had just been released. Getting a copy of the book was the obvious next step. I’m glad I did.

As you’ll read in the book (or even reading the full book description on retail sites), the title of the book comes from advice Joe’s father gave him on his deathbed, to “take risks, and have lots of children.” The point Joe’s father was making, at least as I see it, is that the best things in life come from taking an intelligent risk. Investigate, prepare as best as you can, and then jump. The Russos did exactly that and this book takes us from their initial idea of selling their house, buying an RV, and hitting the road, up to taking the jump which I’ll define as pulling out on the highway in their new home on wheels. The book chronicles this process well.

I can see the appealing to three distinct groups, from least to most important. The first, readers of travel memoirs. While not much travel happens in this book, this is billed as book one in a series and logically the future volumes are going to chronicle the traveling The Russos have done since hitting the road. Travel book readers should start with this first volume as the foundation of understanding the history for future installments. The second group are those who have dreamed of doing exactly what The Russos have done. While everyone’s situation is different and therefore their decision making process would be different, the specifics of the research, thinking process, and decisions The Russos made would be good as a blueprint and to trigger ideas. But the most important is as inspiration. If you’re considering taking a risk, making that jump, the story of others who did that with good results may be just the inspiration you need. It was for me.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

Format/Typo Issues:

A small number of minor proofing issues.

Rating: **** Four Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 70-75,000 words

Friday, December 1, 2017

Reprise Review: The Awful Mess by Sandra Hutchison



Genre: Women’s Fiction

Description:

“Divorced by a husband who wanted children more than her, Mary Bellamy has left behind the Boston suburbs for tiny Lawson, New Hampshire, where she must cope with attentions from an unhappily-married Episcopal priest who'd like to save her heathen soul, but is susceptible to more earthly temptations. She's also wooed by a handsome local cop, an excellent kisser who confuses her by being in favor of gay rights, but opposed to sex before marriage.

Soon Mary also faces a crushing job loss, a pregnancy that wasn't supposed to be possible, a scandalous secret she must keep even at the expense of all her hopes, and an ex-husband whose disintegration threatens all that she has left. In this witty and affectionate tale of small town life, Mary discovers that the connections we make can result in terrifying risks, as well as unexpected blessings.”

Author:

A native Floridian, Sandra Hutchison moved north during high school and has remained there. Currently she lives in Troy, NY with her family and teaches writing at Hudson Valley Community College.

For more, visit Hutchison’s website.

Appraisal:

Reading the book description I realized that everything it says about the things the main character Mary experiences are the kind of happenings that are common, or at least not rare. Surely you’ve known women who have received attention from a married man or a person whose beliefs contradict stereotypes - maybe even seem contradictory.  We’ve all known people who have unexpectedly lost their job or women who have an unplanned pregnancy, even when they believed they weren’t capable of bearing children. And the scenario of someone going off-the-rails in the midst of a divorce, creating issues for their soon-to-be ex isn’t hard to imagine. I think I got drawn into Mary’s story so easily because I didn’t have to suspend disbelief for any of these things. That they happened all at once is the reason the expression “when it rains, it pours,” is now a cliché.

The Awful Mess was an engrossing, well written story. It’s made more so for being so easy to believe it could really happen. I just hope it doesn’t happen to anyone I know.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK
FYI:

Some sex and adult themes. Also, as the author puts it on Amazon, “This book contains some religious themes, but if you require piety and reverence in such matters, this is not the book for you. Skeptics, you will probably be able to cope.”

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count85-90,000 words

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Review: Histories of the Dead by Math Bird


Genre: Short Story Collection/Crime Fiction/Noir

Description:

“Set in the borderlands of northeast Wales, among a landscape of forests and hills, small coastal towns, and the Dee estuary, these are the stories of lonely boys and grief-stricken men, ill-fated lovers, tough women, distant fathers and disillusioned sons. Many of them hell-bent on revenge, battling with both the present and the past. Bird writes about men and women and the social and geographical borders they cross. Throughout these tales runs the influence of place, and how the land and its ghosts can redeem us.”

Author:

“Welsh writer Math Bird has had stories broadcast on BBC Radio 4, Radio Wales, Radio 4 Extra. His work has also appeared in a number of magazines and anthologies.”

Appraisal:

If you like your stories short, crime-ridden, and dark, this is the book for you. Those are qualities all seven of the stories in this collection share. Other things they have in common are, as the description indicates, a setting in Wales and being solidly written, entertaining reads.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Uses UK spelling conventions.

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues

Rating: **** Four Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 20-25,000 words

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Review: Other Fine Gifts by Jeffrey N. Johnson


Genre: Short Story Collection

Description:

“A dynamic collection of stories from the winner of the 2011 Andrew Lytle Fiction Prize. Caught in a chaotic spiral of loss and memory, the characters in Other Fine Gifts often seek solace in their origin. From a man who has lost his home to foreclosure, to another confronting his xenophobia, to a boy in search of God in the stones of Rome, each is in need of enlightenment and redemption. Despite their limited visions and tragic losses, their struggle for memory never impedes their sense of hope.”

Author:

Jeffrey N. Johnson’s “first novel, The Hunger Artist, was a finalist for the Library of Virginia's People's Choice Award for fiction in 2015, and he was awarded the Andrew Lytle Fiction Prize by The Sewanee Review in 2011.”

Appraisal:

An excellent short story collection. While the stories have a variety of plots and unique characters, each is a compelling look at the human condition from one point of view. If you’re a fan of the short story form, especially stories that are contemporary or literary fiction, this collection is one you’ll want to grab.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Adult language.

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 65-70,000 words

Monday, November 27, 2017

25 for 1


25 Authors. One Cause. A Great Deal wrapped in a Good Deed.


That's the short version. The slightly longer version is that 25 authors have each donated a book for this limited time box set. 25 books for only $9.99. All the money that would normally be profit to the authors will go to a charity providing hurricane relief.

We've reviewed some of these authors here. Many others are names I recognize as best-selling authors. If you want more details, visit their website. Or just go straight to Amazon using the links below.

Amazon US                                                              Amazon UK

Friday, November 24, 2017

Reprise Reivew: All The Turns of Light by Frank Tuttle


Genre: Urban Fantasy / YA / Magic / Adventure

Description:

“Join Mug and Meralda as they take to the skies in the long-awaited sequel to All the Paths of Shadow!

The airship Intrepid, fitted with Mage Meralda's flying coils and bearing a crew of a hundred and sixty-two souls, sets out to cross the treacherous Great Sea. If the Intrepid survives the voyage, she will be the first craft of the Realms to ever reach the mysterious Hang homeland. But as Meralda soon discovers, storms and sea-serpents are not the greatest perils she must face. There are powerful forces opposed to the Intrepid's crossing, and the most dangerous foe of all may lurk deep within Meralda's own heart.

If you've a taste for airships and intrigue, magic and more Mug, then climb aboard the Intrepid and dare the vast Great Sea…”

Author:

“Frank Tuttle first began writing under the woefully mistaken impression doing so would release him from the burden of ever doing honest work. ‘It turns out writing is hard,’ said Frank as he pulled out great handfuls of hair. ‘That was never mentioned in Strunk and White’s Elements of Style.’ Frank’s first published works appeared in print magazines such as Weird Tales and Marion Zimmer Bradley’s Fantasy Magazine in the late 1990s. Since then, Frank has published eight Markhat novels and a variety of shorter works. Frank rarely resorts to hair-pulling these days, preferring to weep inconsolably while affixing his toupee.”  

To learn more about Frank Tuttle you can check out his website. However, I suggest following his blog, it is always entertaining.  Of course you may also check him out on Facebook.

Appraisal:

Meralda is a wonderfully intelligent young mage who refuses to compromise her character or magic. She also has the patience of a saint when given what seems like impossible demands from the King of Tirlin. Before liftoff of the airship, Meralda receives a warning message from Phillitrep’s Thinking Engine about the possibility of a final Cosmic Event that will be caused by her in the near future. The whole mission starts off with a series of mishaps that almost lead to devastation of the Intrepid before she even gets out of the hanger. Luckily, Meralda is able to keep a cool head and averts disaster.

The King is sure that the Vonat’s are out to sabotage the Intrepid on its maiden flight and takes extreme measures to thwart their efforts. When strange magical things start happening around Meralda, she slowly starts losing her grip on reality. It is all she can do to keep her head straight and maintain the Intrepid as chief maintenance officer. The last thing she needs is Mrs. Wedding Primsbite, chief penswift for the Tirlin Times, requesting interviews with her. Then Donchen, Meralda’s ever devoted ex-Hang boyfriend who stowed-away onto the airship, learns about an ancient Vonat prophecy that directly affects Meralda and everyone on the Intrepid.

The characters are all well rounded, the dialogue is outstanding, and the non-stop events on board the airship are suspenseful. Luckily, Mug is keeping a journal and is able to keep us up to date on all the other minor details at the end of each day. I loved that his cage now has its own flying coils and he can make himself mobile to travel around the airship as he pleases. He just needs someone to open doors for him occasionally. He is a wonderfully intelligent character that is full of snark and sees truths about Meralda that even she has a hard time admitting.

This is an exciting story full of adventure, danger, and untold magic that will keep you reading late into the night. Mrs. Primsbite turned into quite a unique character that I really enjoyed and I expect Meralda to keep her as a friend and confidant. She needs an older female figure around that she can trust in this male centric wizarding world.

Even though the Intrepid has succeeded in crossing the Great Sea there is still the mysterious Arc that Meralda feels she must find answers for. And the adventures in Hang territory are just beginning.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

This is book two in Paths of Shadow series, and I would recommend reading All the Paths of Shadow first.

Format/Typo Issues:
I found no significant issues in proofing or formatting.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: ?wazithinkin

Approximate word count80-85,000 words

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Review: The Last Deception by D.V. Berkom


Genre: Thriller

Description:

“In the Cold War, you knew who your friends and enemies were. In war today, there’s no difference.

Just when former assassin Leine Basso thinks she’s free from the business of murder and deception, a desperate call from a friend drags her back into the dark world of espionage and arms dealers.

Leine uncovers information that implicates a well-known Russian businessman in a horrendous deception that affects national security and could have global repercussions. It’s up to the former assassin to persuade the powers that be to ignore the obvious and trust her, or disregard the information and bring the world to the brink of a devastating war. Can she make it in time to warn them before The Last Deception?”

Author:

“DV Berkom is the USA Today best-selling author of two action-packed thriller series featuring strong female leads: Leine Basso and Kate Jones. Her love of creating resilient, kick-ass women characters stems from a lifelong addiction to reading spy novels, mysteries, and thrillers, and longing to find the female equivalent within those pages.”

Appraisal:

From book to book it’s hard to predict what kind of situation Leine Basso is going to find herself involved in. That she’s going to acquit herself well, dealing with whatever unexpected twists life throws at her, is the only predictable part of Leine’s life. In this latest installment of the series, Leine finds herself embroiled in a situation that, if it doesn’t go well, could have serious repercussions for much of the world.

As with any good story of this type, action was fast-paced. The reader is kept guessing at what’s going to happen next, and the tension is high. If you’re a thriller reader, especially if you like espionage or spy thrillers, The Last Deception is your kind of book.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Some adult language.

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 70-75,000 words

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Review: The Butcher's Daughter by Florence Grende


Genre: Memoir

Description:

“What was it like to hide with your family in the dense forests of Poland for two long years, as Mameh did, living in a hole in the ground, while being alert, always alert, to the sounds of Nazis and their dogs?

How was it to be both hunter and hunted, as Tateh was, taking up arms, bartering for and stealing food, fighting for another day of life, wounded and recovering, while protecting others hiding in the forest--the old, the infirm, the children?

And what was it like for the narrator, after the war, child of these two people, Mameh and Tateh, who held their stories close? And each of them haunted by the dead?

The Butcher's Daughter lays flesh on the bones of their stories. It is a book meant for all adults and young adults interested in:  the immigrant experience of a family across generations, coming of age in the Bronx, Eastern European Jewish culture, survival and partisan fighting in the frigid and dangerous woods of WWII Eastern Poland, living with and transmitting trauma, and for those just interested in a compelling story.”

Author:

“Florence Grende was born in American Occupied Germany to Holocaust survivor parents and grew up in the Bronx. As a young woman, she earned a Master of Social Work degree, and later, at age sixty, a Master of Fine Arts in creative writing. The Butcher's Daughter is her debut book. She has also pursued careers first as a therapist, then an AT&T union worker, and a mixed-media artist.”

Appraisal:

I imagine memoir readers like reading about the experiences of others for different reasons. At least I know the appeal of a memoir can vary for me, depending on the author and what they have to say. In the case of The Butcher’s Daughter I found a few things that appealed to me.

One is the obvious and the author’s apparent primary goal, getting an understanding of what the author’s parents went through as Jewish people hiding from the Nazis and how that experience impacted the next generation. But I also found comparing the author’s experience to my own to be an interesting mental exercise. While a few years younger and living in a different area, I was impacted by many of the same historical events and cultural shifts. This helped me relate to the events on a more personal level.

Overall an enjoyable read. It should appeal to those who like to read the stories of “real” people (as opposed to the rich and/or famous).

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

Format/Typo Issues:

No significant issues.

Rating: **** Four Stars

Reviewed by: BigAl

Approximate word count: 35-40,000 words

Monday, November 20, 2017

Reprise Review: Conjure Woman's Cat by Malcolm R. Campbell


Genre: Magical Realism / Culture / Spirituality

Description:

“Lena, a shamanistic cat, and her conjure woman Eulalie live in a small town near the Apalachicola River in Florida’s lightly populated Liberty County, where longleaf pines own the world. In Eulalie’s time, women of color look after white children in the homes of white families and are respected, even loved, but distrusted and kept separated as a group…

When some white boys rape and murder a black girl named Mattie near the sawmill, the police have no suspects and don’t intend to find any. Eulalie, who sees conjure as a way of helping the good Lord work His will, intends to set things right by ‘laying tricks.’

But Eulalie has secrets of her own, and it’s hard not to look back on her own life and ponder how the decisions she made while drinking and singing at the local juke were, perhaps, the beginning of Mattie’s ending.”

Author:

Malcolm R. Campbell lives in north Georgia and has worked as a corporate communications director, technical writer, and college journalism instructor. He now works as a grant writer for museums and other nonprofit organizations and writes stories.

For more, visit Campbell’s website.

Appraisal:

The Conjure Woman’s Cat is a novella set in the Florida Panhandle in the 1950s-era about Hoodoo, the KKK, and the blues. The story is told through Lena, Eulalie’s cat and her familiar. Lena is able to spirit walk and communicate with Eulalie. I had no trouble buying into this scenario, this is fiction and I was ready to believe. I found the characters well defined, believable, and they fit into the era the book was written to be in. Eulalie claims to be older than dirt, is full of gumption and spitfire. She has had a hard life and won’t take guff from anyone and she means to set things right. I loved this quote from Lena towards the end of the book.

My Conjure Woman believes no man, woman, or cat should question the consequences of calling upon folk magic, archangels, or the good Lord to rearrange the puzzle pieces that make up the world.

I have heard there is truth in that statement. One can ask the spirits, or pray, but one cannot direct the consequences. So, you better mean what you say and say what you mean.

The plot is multi-layered and confronts racism head-on. If you are offended by certain terms, this may not be the book for you, however it fits the era and is realistic of the times. This story concerns two families in particular. Both being torn apart, one eventually comes to terms with the past so the healing can begin. It’s a realistic and moving story that will break your heart but then try to make you whole again. This book gives you a look at how white justice was handled in the south. It is sad to believe that certain aspects of this still hold true today. No one can undo the past and it could take years to get past the hurt even if the pain is a sacred pain.

I dearly loved Eulalie and Willie, I could easily have been friends with them both. The more I read the name Eulalie the more I adored it. It has a beautiful rhythm and made me smile every time I read it. Eulalie was a wise woman and deserved the respect she was given. Kudos to Malcolm R. Campbell for a story well told.

Buy now from:            Amazon US        Amazon UK

FYI:

Certain racist terms are used within this story, however they fit with the time and the story would seem unrealistic without them. If you are offended by such, perhaps this is not the book for you.

Format/Typo Issues:

I was given an ARC so I really can’t comment on the finished book, but I ran across no significant proofing or formatting issues in the copy I received.

Rating: ***** Five Stars

Reviewed by: ?wazithinkin

Approximate word count30-35,000 words